Special activities


The Expo Extra! exhibition area will be hosting activities, conferences and exchanges around Expo 67 starting in October 2017.

Fall 2017 Programming

Other conferences will be announced in 2018


Man and His Stomach
The foodie experience at Expo 67

Lecture by Roger La Roche

Sunday, October 22, 2017 at 13:30

Duration: 90 minutes
At the Centre d'histoire de Montréal

Regular admission fees apply (includes access to all exhibitions in the museum).

Reservations at 514 872-3207

It’s rather hard today to understand the impact that Expo 67 had on our eating habits. Montreal is now one of the foremost destination for foodies… in 2017, a visit to Montreal is both a cultural and gastronomical experience. But in 1967, pita bread, falafel, sushi, bison meat, or cheese and chocolate fondue are not part of Montrealers' dining experience. It took special legislation in order to serve horse meat at Expo (mostly at the Belgian restaurant). Raw milk cheeses or certain French and Italian deli meats could not legally be imported to Canada except for restaurants at Expo.

And what about British, German or Belgian beers ? Or single malt scotches that were not available in Quebec before 1967…

Expo 67 forever changed Montrealers' (and Quebecers') eating habits. Today, the average citizen will happily participate in the city’s foodie culture but still might be surprised by what restaurants have to offer him.

This conference will introduce you to the impact of the universal exhibition on food and how it changed our eating habits. From Bo Bo balls to Belgian waffles and draft beer available for the first time to women, the gastronomic legacy of Expo is alive and well in Montreal, to the delight of both the residents and visitors.

 

Roger La Roche

Active in environmental protection and sustainable development for 25 years, Roger La Roche has taught at Collège de Rosemont and Université de Sherbrooke. He also taught and led educational missions in countries all over the world, including Vietnam, Bolivia, and Benin. For a decade now, Roger has carried out historical research on world fairs with a special focus on the Montreal World’s Fair of 1967. His research has resulted in the publication of some fifty historical documents on the pavilions of Expo 67 and on related subjects. In his boundless enthusiasm for his subject, he feels lucky to have worked at Expo 67 and its extension (Man and His World) from 1967 to 1973.


What remains of Expo 67? The remains of a pivotal period

Lecture by Julie Bélanger

Sunday, November 5, 2017 at 13:30

Duration: 90 minutes
At the Centre d'histoire de Montréal

Regular admission fees apply (includes access to all exhibitions in the museum).

Reservations at 514 872-3207

Fifty years after the Montreal Universal Exhibition, a 6-month temporary event, what’s left of the physical heritage of Expo 67? Has everything really been demolished long ago, as many believe?

Julie Bélanger is passionate about Expo 67’s heritage and invites you to discover what remains of a pivotal period in the development of modern Quebec. Beyond the few, highly recognized pavilions such as the United States and France, the physical remains of Expo 67 are still numerous and actively used, not only in Montreal but beyond the island as well.

You are invited to examine the evolution of the Expo 67 site throughout the years and discover remains of what marked our world 50 years ago.

 

Julie Bélanger

An Expo 67 geek for as long as she can remember, Julie is one of the most renown specialists on everything Expo 67 and its heritage. 12 years ago, she gave herself a mission: raise awareness amongst the general public of Expo 67’s heritage and the evolution of its location since 1967.

To help her achieve her goal, she created a guided visit of the Expo 67 site, which she has offered for free between April and October, every year since 2007. She is also the creator of the most important group of fans, researchers, authors, architects, museum staff and others on Expo 67.

Throughout the years, her group became the best reference for all information related to the Montreal Universal Exhibition. Julie literally has Expo 67 under her skin, as she can be easily recognized by the tattoo of the Expo 67 logo that she wears proudly on her arm. An active collector, her living room is home to a front section of an Expo Express train car. Organizing public visits at Habitat 67 has been Julie’s dream for years and she’s the one responsible for making it possible in 2017.


Woman and His World/Youth and His World
The impact of women and youth on Expo 67

Lecture by Roger La Roche

Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 13:30

Duration: 90 minutes
At the Centre d'histoire de Montréal

Regular admission fees apply (includes access to all exhibitions in the museum).

Reservations at 514 872-3207

Was Expo 67 truly a "Man's World"? When you look at photos and films of the period, one might think that women played no role in the exhibition, except of course as hostesses. But in reality, they played an important role both in the planning and running of the exhibition. Thanks to a grant from the natural gas industry, they had their own pavilion (the Hospitality Pavilion) – where men were not allowed – where great conferences on the changing place of women in the world was discussed, where feminism took root, and where you could also get a make-up demonstration and watch a fashion show.

As for youth, thanks to Pierre Dupuy, who fought for them, they also had their own pavilion at La Ronde: the Youth Pavilion. There, you could find conferences on a multitude of social, political, historical subjects. Art was everywhere and so was music. The Greatfull Dead played there, as did Robert Charlebois; Walter Boudreault was a regular, and "happenings" were regular attractions. Never in the history of Quebec was there another cultural incubator so rich in discovery and experimentation… 1967 was clearly about “Youth and Their World”.

This conference will take you inside the planning and execution of both these pavilions and will present the challenges and impact of these two pavilions on Quebec’s society.

 

Roger La Roche

Active in environmental protection and sustainable development for 25 years, Roger La Roche has taught at Collège de Rosemont and Université de Sherbrooke. He also taught and led educational missions in countries all over the world, including Vietnam, Bolivia, and Benin. For a decade now, Roger has carried out historical research on world fairs with a special focus on the Montreal World’s Fair of 1967. His research has resulted in the publication of some fifty historical documents on the pavilions of Expo 67 and on related subjects. In his boundless enthusiasm for his subject, he feels lucky to have worked at Expo 67 and its extension (Man and His World) from 1967 to 1973.


Bang! Expo 67, Musical Explosion!

Lecture by Louis Rastelli from ARCMTL

Sunday, December 10, 2017 at 13:30

Duration: 90 minutes
At the Centre d'histoire de Montréal

Regular admission fees apply (includes access to all exhibitions in the museum).

Reservations at 514 872-3207

Over the course of six months in 1967, Expo 67 hosted hundreds of different musicians, bands, singers and orchestras, ranging from biggest international stars to the newest young Montreal rock and pop bands. Louis Rastelli, director of the local non-profit arts and cultural archive Arcmtl, will showcase the massive explosion of music that was heard that summer 50 years ago at Expo 67, highlighting some of the most important concerts, events, composers and musicians involved, and explaining the huge impact this had on Quebec’s own musical milieu.

The art, design, films and architecture of Expo 67 were well known for being very avant-garde in style, showing off the latest trends and technologies. The same can be said for music: some of the most avant-garde and innovative composers, musicians and bands in the world played shows at Expo and provided futuristic music to accompany experimental films, exhibits and installations in various pavilions.

Indoor and outdoor stages all over Expo 67, as well as at Place des Arts downtown, hosted popular musical acts every day. Nearly every possible style of music was included, from jazz to rock to rhythm & blues and opera, at a time when popular music itself was undergoing huge changes. Come and hear all about the incredible music that came to Expo and Montreal in the summer of '67!

 

Louis Rastelli

Louis Rastelli is a co-founder and current Director of ARCMTL, a non-profit organization in Montreal that both preserves local culture at its archive centre and promotes it through various projects, festivals and exhibits. He also hosts ARCMTL’s weekly radio show, Montreal Sound Ark, on CKUT 90.3 FM on Fridays from 3 to 5 pm, playing only Montreal music from the past several decades. He has coordinated various projects marking the 50th anniversary of Expo 67 in 2017 and visited Terre des Hommes many times as a child in the 1970s.

ARCMTL

ARCMTL is a non-profit organization founded in 1998 with a mandate to simultaneously promote and preserve local independent culture.

It’s the only organization in Montreal tasked with preserving the local “underground” or independent arts milieu — cultural artifacts that are by nature very ephemeral and which aren’t normally on the radar of institutional archives or libraries. Its collections comprise thousands of publications, artworks, audio-visual and ephemeral material dating from the 1950s to today. The archive centre is available for consultation on appointment by researchers, students and people interested in Montreal history and culture. Archive Montreal also lends material for use in exhibits and projects organized by other organizations and regularly assists projects such as anthologies, compilations, documentary film and others in finding rare material as well as rightsholders.