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Montréal Community Sustainable Development Plan

The objectives according to the plan

Recover Montréal’s waste

Recover 80% of recyclables and organic materials, HHW, CRD waste and bulky refuse by 2019, as stipulated in Montréal’s Municipal Waste Management Master Plan (in French)

Recover Montréal’s wasteIn the last five years, there has been a considerable increase in recovered materials, except for organic matter. In 2008, the rate of recovery of recyclables was 53%. This rate was 54% for hazardous household waste (HHW) and 43% for CRD waste and bulky refuse. However, for organic matter, the recovery rate was only 8%. The overall recovery rate for the Montréal agglomeration was 31%.

The perceived value of residual material has evolved over the last decade. It is no longer seen as mere waste, but increasingly as a potential resource.

The objective of Montréal’s Municipal Waste Management Master Plan for 2010–2014 is to divert from elimination as many materials as possible in residential areas. The collection of recyclables is now available to all citizens, so the challenge in the coming years is to start large-scale collection of organic matter. Of course, reduction at the source is still the most effective means to reduce the amount of residual materials produced.

There are more than 58,000 establishments in industry, businesses and institutions, as well as the construction, renovation and demolition sectors within the agglomeration of Montréal. All sectors of activity can contribute to reducing residual materials slated for elimination by implementing their own recovery programs

Action 22 : Implement at-source waste reduction measures

Reduction at the source is still the most effective means to reduce the amount of residual materials produced. To accomplish this, several measures can be taken.

Montréal therefore undertakes to:
  • Ban single-use water bottles in municipal buildings, replace water bottles with pitchers and glasses, and install water fountains in appropriate locations.
  • Replace No. 6 plastics in food banks run by the Ville de Montréal.
Among other things, partners agree to:
  • Replace single-use water bottles with pitchers and glasses.
  • Install water fountains.
  • Use double-sided printing and introduce paper-saving programs.
  • Use primarily reusable products and replace No. 6 plastics with recyclable materials.

Action 23 : Implement recycling and reuse measures

To divert as many materials as possible from elimination and, eventually, to bury only the remaining residual materials, it is imperative that large-scale collection of organic matter be introduced. As such, two anaerobic digestion centres, two composting centres and a pilot centre for the pre-treatment of organic waste will be built. Over the next five years, more than 500,000 housing units will be targeted, enabling the treatment of 230,000 tons of organic matter.

Among other advantages, building new ecocentres will make it easier for citizens to dispose of hazardous household waste (HHW). Also, broadening the scope of producers’ responsibilities means they will be accountable for the recycling and reuse of specific products. The agglomeration will play an active, yet complementary role in providing producers access to its ecocentres.

Montréal therefore undertakes to:
  • Offer organic waste collection services to citizens (eight-dwelling units or less).
  • Build two anaerobic digestion centres, two composting centres and a pilot centre for the pre treatment of organic waste.
  • Divert construction, renovation and demolition (CRD) waste from elimination and transport it to waste treatment facilities.
  • Offer only one waste collection day per week.
  • Expand the network of ecocentres.
Among other things, partners agree to:
  • Take part in one of the three levels of RECYC-QUÉBEC’s ICI ON RECYCLE! recognition program.
  • Transport CRD waste to a treatment facility.

Action 24 : Hold eco-responsible events

The Bureau de normalisation du Québec (BNQ) has developed a certification program to standardize ecoresponsible event management. This standard covers a variety of topics, from sourcing suppliers to waste management.

Any organization can apply the criteria set out in the standard on a voluntary basis to evaluate its own events. However, organizations seeking certification for their events must absolutely fulfill the requirements stipulated in the standard.

Montréal therefore undertakes to:
  • Obtain a certification in responsible event management (standard BNQ 9700-253/2010) by 2011 for the Direction de l’environnement et du développement durable.
  • Encourage responsible event management among promoters holding events in the public arena.
  • Adopt sustainable development criteria for festivals and events in Montréal, in compliance with Québec’s standard for ecoresponsible event management.
Among other things, partners agree to:
  • Become certified in responsible event management (standard BNQ 9700-253/2010).
  • Hold eco-responsible events (for events and meetings of all sizes).

Montréal Community Sustainable Development Plan 2010-2015